Local

Widow Of Nigerian Police Inspector Laments Husband’s Benefits Unpaid Since He Was Killed In 2007

Elizabeth Abdul

Elizabeth Abdul’s residence in Tasha Gwa-Gwa, Federal Capital Territory (FCT), Abuja, was invaded by armed robbers on May 30, 2007. Tragically, they fatally shot her husband and inflicted multiple gunshot wounds on her.

“The robbers came into our compound and started shooting,” Elizabeth recounted. “My husband, a police officer, was shot. Before they could rush him to the hospital, he died.”

The robbers didn’t just take her husband’s life; they left Elizabeth with severe injuries. “The attackers shot me in my left and right hands, bullets are still in my body,” she said, highlighting the physical scars that remain as painful reminders of that night.

Elizabeth’s husband, who until his death was a police inspector, left her with five children to care for. Despite his service, it was noted that the financial support from the Nigerian police had been dishearteningly insufficient.

“Since his death 17 years ago, the police have only given me N180,000 for burial cost,” she stated.

She outlined the sporadic and meagre payments: “In 2014, they paid me N90,000, and later another N60,000. The last payment was N30,000 in 2018.” These amounts have done little to alleviate her struggles or provide for her children’s needs.

Elizabeth expressed her frustration with the bureaucratic delays and lack of communication. “I don’t know why I’m yet to receive my husband’s benefits,” she lamented.

“In 2018, a man called me and said the issue of my husband is on his table, but nothing has happened since.”

The robbers stole items from their home, but the real loss was far greater.

“My husband died leaving me with five children. He died as an Inspector of Police,” she said, underscoring the personal and professional void left by his passing.

Elizabeth, who made this known during the Brekete Family programme, also shed light on the challenges faced by many widows of public servants in Nigeria.

Her plea is not just for financial support but for justice and recognition of her husband’s service and sacrifice.

Our reporter contacted the Force Police Public Relations Officer (PPRO), Muyiwa Adejobi for comments, but he did not answer his phone.

He also did not reply to a text message sent to him.