Breaking

FCTA, Rotary others take tree-planting campaign to Abuja suburb 


In an effort to boost Abuja greening drive, the FCT Department of Parks and Recreation, in collaboration with Rotary Club of Abuja Deluxe and other nongovernmental organisations has commenced planting of six thousand trees in Katampe District of Abuja, the nation’s capital city, as a strategy to beautifying and saving the environment.

Flagging off the exercise at the Patrick Yakowa Street, in Katampe Extension, Director of Parks and Recreation Department, Isaiah Ukpana, said there are about 30 streets in the district, as part of its tree-planting effort across three selected districts in which Katampe is the last.

He stated that the trees were supplied through partnership with a lot of organisations, adding that “for instance in Katampe District, we have, Rotary Club Purple Hands, Astrazenica and Parks Association amongst other NGOs.”

He said there is a lot of professionalism going into the exercise, to ensure that selected trees are those that their roots will not damage underground infrastructure within the green verge.

In terms of maintenance and sustainability of the project, he said: “On our own part, we are doing a lot of watering, to make sure that these trees during the dry season can still survive.

“We are hoping to plant about 6,000 trees here (Katampe District). In this district, some roads have been planted earlier, and we have about 30 streets. In the next few years, this environment will change because tree planting is an environmentally friendly activity, which every citizen should nuture.

“Trees give good landmark to  community, purifies the environment and helps to control erosion. To this extent, it is important for us to own the trees. We encourage residents of this neighbourhood to do so,” he stated.

On her part, president, Rotary Club of Abuja Deluxe, Brenda Max-Nduaguibe, noted that the club plant trees as a strategy to sustainably and contribute to saving the environment, which is one of its seven areas of focus this year.