Tech

How war between China and Taiwan could spark shortages of smartphones, computers and brake sensors as Taipei manufactures 60% of the world’s semiconductors

60998017 11074335 image a 155 1659473369670
Written by enews

There have been major concerns in the tech industry over supplies if China invades Taiwan amid escalating tensions between the two countries.

Experts have said the world’s most advanced chip factory on the island would be presented as ‘not operable’, plunging the global supply chain into chaos – resulting in shortages of smartphones, computers and brake sensors.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has visited Taiwan despite repeated warnings from China, claiming it violates the ‘one-China principle’.

She landed in Taipei this morning and was received by Foreign Minister Joseph Wu, before China’s foreign ministry quickly criticized the move, calling it a “serious defiance of China’s strong opposition”.

Apple’s chip maker, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC), has warned that a war between Taiwan and China will “harm everyone,” leading to economic turmoil.

Apple chipmaker Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) has warned that ‘everyone will be defeated’ by the war between Taiwan and China

Pictured TSMC president Mark Liu said earlier this week that the chipmaker’s plant, the world’s largest semiconductor maker, would not be able to operate if the Chinese invaded because it could not be run ‘by force’. Is.

Liu insisted it would lead to a supply chain crisis that would spread as far away as the US, which last month passed a bill trying to fix the shortfall.

Liu insisted it would lead to a supply chain crisis that would spread as far away as the US, which last month passed a bill trying to fix the shortfall.

60978069 11074335 image a 134 1659473087493 Police officers stand guard outside the Grand Hyatt Hotel as protesters participate in a protest against the visit of US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi in Taipei

Police officers stand guard outside the Grand Hyatt Hotel as protesters participate in a protest against the visit of US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi in Taipei

TSMC chairman Mark Liu said earlier this week that the chipmakers plant, the world’s largest semiconductor maker, would not be able to function if the Chinese invaded.

He told CNN: ‘No one can control TSMC by force. If you take a military force or attack, you will not be able to operate the TSMC factory.

‘Because it is such a sophisticated manufacturing facility, it relies on real-time connections with the outside world, with Europe, with Japan, with the US, from materials to chemicals to spare parts to engineering software and diagnostics. Is.’

He urged Beijing to think twice before taking any action, as China accounts for 10 per cent of TSMC’s business.

Liu stressed that this would lead to a supply chain crisis as far away as the US, which last month passed a bill to try to fix the shortfall.

With Taiwan manufacturing more than 60 percent of the world’s semiconductors last year, Liu urged all sides to think of ways to avoid war so that ‘the engine of the world economy keeps humming’.

He said lessons should be learned from the Russian invasion of Ukraine, as the war there has led to a “lose, defeat, defeat” situation for the Western world as well as Russia and Ukraine.

Pelosi’s visit has made her the highest-ranking US official to visit the island in 25 years.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi arrived in Taiwan on Tuesday, defying warnings from China, angering the government

Speaker Nancy Pelosi arrived in Taiwan on Tuesday, defying warnings from China, angering the government

Supporters hold a banner outside the hotel where US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is staying in Taipei, Taiwan

Supporters hold a banner outside the hotel where US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is staying in Taipei, Taiwan

Taipei claimed that more than 20 Chinese military planes entered Taiwan's airspace on the day of Pelosi's visit

Taipei claimed that more than 20 Chinese military planes entered Taiwan’s airspace on the day of Pelosi’s visit

Four US ships, including the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (pictured in a file photo) were deployed to waters east of Taiwan on 'routine' deployments, amid intense warnings from China on Pelosi's voyage.

Four US ships, including the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (pictured in a file photo) were deployed to waters east of Taiwan on ‘routine’ deployments, amid intense warnings from China on Pelosi’s voyage.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi tweeted a photo of the arrival of the congressional delegation in Taipei with the words: 'Our visit reiterates that the US stands with Taiwan: a strong, vibrant democracy and our valued partner in the Indo-Pacific'

Speaker Nancy Pelosi tweeted a photo of the arrival of the congressional delegation in Taipei with the words: ‘Our visit reiterates that the US stands with Taiwan: a strong, vibrant democracy and our valued partner in the Indo-Pacific’

Why did China keep an eye on Taiwan?

There has been a long-standing dispute between China and Taiwan over the sovereignty of the island.

China considers Taiwan a part of its territory, more precisely a province, but many Taiwanese want the island to be independent.

From 1683 to 1895, Taiwan was ruled by the Qing dynasty of China. After Japan claimed its victory in the First Sino-Japanese War, the Qing government was forced to cede Taiwan to Japan.

After World War II, with the consent of its allies, the US and Britain, the island was under the rule of the Republic of China.

The leader of the Chinese Nationalist Party, Chiang Kai-shek, fled to Taiwan in 1949 and established his own government after losing the civil war to the Communist Party and its leader Mao Zedong.

Chiang’s son continued to rule Taiwan after his father and began to democratize Taiwan.

In 1980, China put forward a policy called ‘one country, two systems’, under which Taiwan would be given significant autonomy if it accepted Chinese reunification. Taiwan rejected the offer.

Taiwan today, with its own constitution and democratically elected leaders, is widely accepted in the West as an independent state. But its political position is not clear.

This enraged China, which views the self-governing island nation as its own territory, despite it having never been governed.

Chinese President Xi Jinping has threatened to forcefully unite the two countries, with Beijing’s People’s Liberation Army conducting live-fire exercises in direct violation of the White House’s request.

According to the state Xinjua news agency, the exercise will take place from August 4 to 7, when the PLA’ will conduct important military exercises and training activities, including live-fire drills in the following maritime areas and surrounded by lines joining their airspace. ,

Additionally, Taipei claimed that more than 20 Chinese military aircraft entered Taiwan’s airspace on the day of Pelosi’s visit. As Speaker’s Air Force C40 approached Taipei, Chinese Air Force Su-35 fighter jets were crossing the Taiwan Strait, local media outlets reported.

Chilling footage shared on Chinese social network Weibo shows amphibious tanks off the coast of Fujian along the Taiwan Strait. Further footage showed military equipment moving in the city of Xiamen.

The White House defended Pelosi’s right to visit Taiwan, while President Joe Biden’s administration said the speaker makes his own decisions.

She said she heads a different branch of government and there has been no change in the United States’ one-China policy, with the administration warning Beijing not to harm the speaker.

NHK said eight US F-15 fighter jets and five tanker aircraft took off from a US base in Okinawa to provide security for Pelosi’s flight.

Taiwan warmly welcomed Pelosi. The island’s tallest building, TAIPEI 101, lit up with a welcome message for Speaker Pelosi and supporters put up welcome signs outside the hotel she will reportedly stay in.

His visit, which was never publicly announced for security reasons, is part of a wider visit to Singapore, Malaysia, South Korea and Japan.

Source

About the author

enews